Sibling Reunion Gariep Dam – Part 2

May, all over the country, was likely to have changeable weather.  In the Western Cape we were praying for rain as our dams are empty and the earth is dry.  We also hoped that it would fall at Great Brak to dampen the fires around Rondom Mooi!   We heard that they received a spit and a spot but not enough to kill the fire completely.
In the Free State there are currently no water problems!  Gariep Dam is full and while we were there we had rain every day.  The wonderful thing about this part of the world is that it thunders, lightning flashes, you get a downpour and then it clears up beautifully till the next shower.    It didn’t dampen our spirits at all.  The squatters still managed to spend most of the time outdoors, but we ate the rest of our suppers at the bungalow.

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Andrew (farmer and pastor) gave thanks for our meal and gathering

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John and Karly’s chicken potjie was delicious

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Karly sharing words of wisdom with Eddie

My amazing hubby was moved to give all the ailing ones a therapeutic foot massage. Nothing better!

During the day each couple was responsible for their own breakfasts and lunches but most often Earl and John joined forces to cook bacon and eggs and sometimes the others joined us at campsite.  And before supper you would find us chilling on the ‘verandah’ of The Mount Nelson on Wheels for sundowners.   It was a chilled and happy time with lots of bonding, chatting and encouraging each other.

The environment was delightful.  Our campsite was shady and many of the trees were wearing their autumn colours.  The birds were chirpy and the fish were biting.

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But the plebs enjoyed their squatter camp too. This poor relation is cooking brekkie

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We often had visiting cousins who unfortunately had to be chased back into their trees

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Sundowners before dinner

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The sunrises were spectacular

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The Cape Robins were quite friendly

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African Pied Wagtail

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This Common (Indian) Myna had a wonky leg but managed very well in spite of it

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A lovely yellowfish caught and released

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So pretty

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After the rain

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The two caravan sites

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The Rondawel

On the Thursday Barbara, Andrew, Diane, Earl and I took a drive around the Gariep area and were impressed by the size of the Dam.    Gariep Hydroelectric power station is 300 meters downstream of the dam wall n the banks of The Orange River on the Eastern Cape side.  Gariep’s first two machines went into commercial service in 1971 and the last two in March 1976.

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View showing the vastness of the dam

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Big Sus and Little Sus with the dam in the background

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The Orange River with hydroelectric plant on the left

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A lot of time was spent on the “Mount Nelson on Wheels” front verandah

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But the plebs enjoyed their squatter camp too. This poor relation is cooking brekkie

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We often had visiting cousins who unfortunately had to be chased back into their trees

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Sundowners before dinner

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The sunrises were spectacular

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The Cape Robins were quite friendly

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Enter a caption

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A lovely yellowfish caught and released

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So pretty

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After the rain

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The two caravan sites

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The Rondawel

On the Thursday Barbara, Andrew, Diane, Earl and I took a drive around the Gariep area and were impressed by the size of the Dam.    Gariep Hydroelectric power station is 300 meters downstream of the dam wall n the banks of The Orange River on the Eastern Cape side.  Gariep’s first two machines went into commercial service in 1971 and the last two in March 1976.

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View showing the vastness of the dam

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Big Sus and Little Sus with the dam in the background

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The Orange River with hydroelectric plant on the left

The Orange River is the longest river in the country.  It rises in the Drakensberg in Lesotho and flows westwards through South Africa to the Atlantic Ocean.  It is part of the international borders between South Africa and Namibia between South Africa and Lesotho.  It also forms the borders between several provinces of South Africa.  The Orange River provides water for irrigation and for hydroelectric power. The river was named by Robert Gordon, the commander of the Dutch East India Company garrison at Cape Town,  in honor of William V of Orange. The original Khoi people called the river Gariep.  In Lesotho it is known as the Senqu River.

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It was a chilly day and when we got back Shirl treated us to some freshly baked scones with jam

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They were delicious, thank Shirl!

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Sunrise on our last day

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All of us before saying farewell – Earl, Barbara, Andrew, Diane, Shirley,

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The Four Stone Siblings – Shirl, Diane, John and Barbara

On Friday when we left we all agreed that this should be an annual event!   Next to turn 70???   I believe it’s John next September!

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